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Tigus

Tigus

Currently reading

The Invisible Eye
Alexandre Chatrian, Émile Erckmann, Erckmann-Chatrian, Hugh Lamb
Progress: 173/408 pages
The Sergeant's Cat & Other Stories
Janwillem van de Wetering
Progress: 210/247 pages
Different Class
Joanne Harris
Progress: 188/416 pages

Reading progress update: I've read 1 out of 436 pages.

The Domino Killer - Neil White

my last two Crime novel reads were both fairly old - 1960s, 1940s - so I’m ready for something modern, and with more pages. that said, I almost went to another Maigret novel, because the last one blew me away...but Simenon and his creation will have to wait at least a few days.

Reading progress update: I've read 190 out of 301 pages.

Black Fortunes: The Story of the First Six African Americans Who Escaped Slavery and Became Millionaires - Shomari Wills

the author seems to have the wildest life-stories for last. which means the book is still a great read, even as it moves out of the era of the earliest black millionaires.

Reading progress update: I've read 114 out of 301 pages.

Black Fortunes: The Story of the First Six African Americans Who Escaped Slavery and Became Millionaires - Shomari Wills

Mary Ellen Pleasant was an amazing woman, that’s for sure. also enjoying Robert Reed Church’s story, when the chapters switch back to him. a terrific book, so far...a wonderful education.

Reading progress update: I've read 72 out of 408 pages.

The Invisible Eye - Alexandre Chatrian, Émile Erckmann, Erckmann-Chatrian, Hugh Lamb

the last two stories I read in this book - ‘The White and the Black’, and ‘The Burgomaster in Bottle’ - were entertaining, though the second one represents a recurring nitpick I have: more could have been done with a nifty idea. but most of the tales are quick, and don’t get a reader as interested in the characters and their supernatural dilemmas as would a more modern treatment of the same premise, or - in terms of stories roughly as old - say, something by Poe or Le Fanu, etc.

Reading progress update: I've read 1 out of 301 pages.

Black Fortunes: The Story of the First Six African Americans Who Escaped Slavery and Became Millionaires - Shomari Wills

last February I had a very rewarding time picking some reads for Black History Month, including at least one Nonfiction book, so I’m hoping for the same experience this year too.

Reading progress update: I've read 110 out of 168 pages.

The Cellars of the Majestic - Georges Simenon,  Howard Curtis (Translator)

one of my favourites in the series, so far - and not just because everything in it is wafting up from a hotel cellar (although, that’s a great place for a corpse...).

Reading progress update: I've read 2 out of 168 pages.

The Cellars of the Majestic - Georges Simenon,  Howard Curtis (Translator)

I love Crime & Mystery novels set in hotels; add Maigret, and I’ll check in and sign the register.

Reading progress update: I've read 155 out of 212 pages.

The Thirty-First of February - Julian Symons

shall try to finish it tonight, even though I’m a bit under the weather. the book takes my mind off sniffles, though. it’s a dark journey of strange encounters, haunting dreams, and maybe madness coming inevitably after a three-week-old tragedy. Murder Must Advertise meets A Judgement in Stone. no, wait, that’s not quite right, but not far off...

 

Reading progress update: I've read 175 out of 247 pages.

The Sergeant's Cat & Other Stories - Janwillem van de Wetering

four tales left, and his novel called The Mind-Murders in the near future. everything very Zen.

Reading progress update: I've read 64 out of 212 pages.

The Thirty-First of February - Julian Symons

my goodness - at this point, I don’t know which time-keeping device is creepier: the millennium-countdown clock from Gerard Stembridge’s Counting Down, or the calendar in Anderson’s office in this Symons novel. whatever, this is a slow-burn Crime story of a type I tend to enjoy. slow disintegration, and perhaps some form of justice at the end. at least that calendar has been dealt with...but what’s next will likely be even more toxic.

Reading progress update: I've read 1 out of 212 pages.

The Thirty-First of February - Julian Symons

I had such an interesting time with Symons’s The Belting Inheritance not too many days ago, that I’m unable to quell the impulse to, well, get right with another book of his!

Reading progress update: I've read 130 out of 261 pages.

River of Shadows - Valerio Varesi, Joseph Farrell

the river Po floods, and two people die...separated by distance, but connected by blood. and no, it’s much more complicated than “the river got them”. murder. decades-old secrets, decades-old hatred between those in and around Torricella who once were divided up into Fascists and Partisans. or is that where Commissario Soneri should be digging? 

 

really enjoying this one, especially all these grizzled and toughened characters living by the river, no matter how hard, or sinister, things get.

Reading progress update: I've read 155 out of 247 pages.

The Sergeant's Cat & Other Stories - Janwillem van de Wetering

this time, Grijpstra & de Gier investigated the murder of a mussel breeder - story called ‘Houseful of Mussels’. I could not tell you why I loved this crazy story so much...I just know that I did. this is a weird, and often very amusing, collection of stories. the last one made me laugh out loud, and that’s always appreciated. wanting more.

Reading progress update: I've read 1 out of 261 pages.

River of Shadows - Valerio Varesi, Joseph Farrell

always time for another Italian Crime novel, always ready to sample a new author from this sub genre, and gosh I love the title, and cover, of this book.

Reading progress update: I've read 163 out of 303 pages.

Running Hot - Dreda Say Mitchell

it’s such a great story, with Schoolboy at the center. he’s an inspired character, his past, the details of his life as they are revealed to the reader. this, and a power plot. and I even get Lord Tribulation showing up in this one now and then!

"‘If you asked me this five years ago, a year ago, six months ago, I would have agreed. But you know what, I started to realize, so I went to a shithouse of a school, so some of my teachers were full of out-and-out fuckrees, so the screws in prison weren’t looking for me to enlighten them about the events of Black History Month. The one thing I learnt on the street was that there’s just you, your intentions and a world out there. And you have to decide, where do I fit in? Do I want to spend the rest of my days eating peri-peri chicken from Nando’s? No fucking way. This is my life, this is my time, this is my...’ He stopped, looking for a word to complete what he wanted to say.

‘Pilgrimage.’ He found his word and stopped . Fucking hell, he sounded like Mother Dorinda.

‘I don’t want any more excuses...’ he began.

‘Yeah, but...’

‘I know what you’re going to say. Ain’t it tough for our black men? Ain’t that another boulder someone has put in our way? And it’s true, but the power I’m feeling inside of me, right here - ‘

He grabbed her wind-warped wrist and placed her hand over the pulse in the groove of his breastbone. They felt it belting, beating, alive, awake, joining them for the first time in years. He forced her hand deeper.

‘This keeps telling me that I am the most powerful thing in my life and no wall, no teachers, no...nothing is going to stand in my way. The only thing holding me back is myself.’"

Runnng Hot, by Dreda Say Mitchell (copyright 2004; quote is from page 162 of the Maia Press Limited trade paperback edition, 2004).