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Tigus

Tigus

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Resorting to Murder: Holiday Mysteries: A British Library Crime Classic (British Library Crime Classics)
Martin Edwards
Progress: 169/278 pages
Batman by Ed Brubaker Vol. 1
Scott McDaniel, Ed Brubaker
Progress: 6/288 pages
A Watery Grave
Jean Chapman
Progress: 4/224 pages

Reading progress update: I've read 1 out of 439 pages.

Little Sister (Detective Pieter Vos) - David Hewson

I sure don't see a problem finishing this 400+ page Crime novel before the Pietr the Latvian Buddy Read kicks in, way up on the 15th; heck, if things go like last time, I'll get done this a day early, and have to squeeze something short in, just before Simenon. If anyone wants to contemplate a Buddy Read just before the official Buddy Read, I would be reading a short old novel called The Night Watch, by Thomas Walsh, just ahead of Pietr--and never fear...if you found that novel at the library or got it some other way, and I didn't finish Little Sister in time to squeeze in The Night Watch, I wouldn't let you down! we would just read The Night Watch as a Buddy Read right after the official Buddy Read! no takers, that's fine too. meanwhile, all this off-topic chatter doesn't mean I'm not excited to finally cue up a David Hewson novel again, after many years. and this one sounds great!

Reading progress update: I've read 299 out of 390 pages.

A Dance of Mirrors  - David Dalglish

terrifically exciting! war with the elves looms large...and I think I know who the Wraith is, underneath that cowl.

Reading progress update: I've read 158 out of 390 pages.

A Dance of Mirrors  - David Dalglish

a shocking murder--a brutal betrayal--and my shock comes mainly from who committed it.

Reading progress update: I've read 65 out of 390 pages.

A Dance of Mirrors  - David Dalglish

the start of this one suggests that it may end up being one of my favorite entries in the series. of course, I left behind a bunch of Murder Mysteries for a Fantasy diversion...and I'm back in the midst of another Murder Mystery. of course, I don't mind in the slightest!

Beyond Martin Edwards, List 1

If you like

 

 

Here are some follow-ups I recommend, for various reasons (they aren't all "Impossible Crime" books, but I have done the best I can to assemble a strong list of books that may work for you), if Anthony Wynne's crazy-clever book is your type of Mystery!

 

The List:

 

 

 

 

 

Thanks for your time, and happy reading!

"The house stank of liquored-up Kool-Aid and delusions of invincibility. "

Dear Daughter, by Elizabeth Little (copyright 2014; quote is from page 311 of the Penguin Books trade paperback edition).

Reading progress update: I've read 1 out of 390 pages.

A Dance of Mirrors  - David Dalglish

definitely in the mood for something other than a Crime novel...but then, most of the Crime novels I've read over the last 20 days or more have been pretty darn special, so let's hope this detour keeps up that trend of fun and high quality. first two books in this series were very enjoyable...

Reading progress update: I've read 82 out of 278 pages.

Resorting to Murder: Holiday Mysteries: A British Library Crime Classic (British Library Crime Classics) - Martin Edwards

'Murder!', by Arnold Bennett is my favorite story in this collection so far (not necessarily my favorite title). I thought I was getting the usual bag of beans: a nasty bit of murder, amateur detective shows up to rival the regular coppers in their efforts, looks like there are some clues that will get everything resolved with justice served...and then this wonderful  and wicked little tale deliberately went off the trail and danced its way into a cool, less-familiar wilderness. and I loved that! that was fun.

"One of my tutors back in Switzerland was this stickly ex-classics don who'd left his post at King's College after being caught with two of his students in a position so compromising Catullus himself would have blushed . Nigel was cheerfully unrepentant about the whole thing, as evidenced by the fact that he was comfortable telling me about it as he was elucidating the finer points of Homeric Greek. His second-favorite story, though, was about this poet--his name was Simonides--who was performing one night for a bunch of rich guys when, boom, the banquet-hall collapsed and crushed everyone inside.

Everyone, that is, except for Simonides, who had, serendipitously, stepped outside just moments before the accident.

The bodies of the dinner guests were so fucked up that when it came time to arrange for the burials no one could figure out who was who. But Simonides was known for his great big brain, and so the families turned to him for assistance. "Help us," they begged him. "Help us identify our loved ones so that we might put them to rest with their ancestors! Please, sir, tell us anything you can remember!" What happened next, as Nigel told me, was that Simonides closed his eyes, took a deep breath, and then proceeded to write the names of each and every guest in the exact order of their placement at the table.

Simonides: proof that poets can actually be good at parties."

Dear Daughter, by Elizabeth Little (copyright 2014; quote is from pages 80-81 of the Penguin Books trade paperback edition).

Reading progress update: I've read 288 out of 365 pages.

Dear Daughter: A Novel - Elizabeth E. Little

I may very well leave the last chunk of this until tomorrow morning; we'll just have to see if Temptation conquers Tiredness. whatever...I have a feeling the "twist" (see blurbs) ending will go great with a morning coffee. beyond that--well, I'm afraid of what else Jane will find out about the life, and violent death, of her mother. I think the last few pieces of the puzzle will (a) be ugly, and (b) lead to Jane being in severe danger.

"The drive to Adeline was rough going. The road hadn't been properly maintained for years and was potholed and buckled, the trees pushing their roots up through the pavement, eager to reclaim their land. The hired shuttle bus wasn't equipped for the terrain, and it jolted us unpredictably up into the air and then back down on the hard rubber seats. It didn't feel so different from that time I fucked a heavy-metal drummer."
"

Dear Daughter, by Elizabeth Little (copyright 2014; quote is from page 135 of the Penguin Books trade paperback edition).

Reading progress update: I've read 238 out of 365 pages.

Dear Daughter: A Novel - Elizabeth E. Little

pretty far along with this, now; it reminds me of two books I recently enjoyed: it has a sassy style like Helen Fitzgerald's Viral (though the young, female first-person narrator is hiding a lot of pain and unresolved issues behind the glib cynicalness)--a book I loved--attached to a plot that's more like Hester Young's The Gates of Evangeline (a whiff of Gothic; family secrets; attractive men who may not be good for the heroine--no ghosts in Dear Daughter so far, though...well, no actual ghosts)--a book I loved even more. all that, and the book carves its own unique feel, its own distinct Mystery. hard to say if it will match those other two books, but it's workin' hard. I like it.

Reading progress update: I've read 112 out of 365 pages.

Dear Daughter: A Novel - Elizabeth E. Little

okay...that snapped my head back a bit. that's the kind of plot twist that instantly takes your mind off the two excellent plot twists in the book you finished just over 24 hours ago. which is a good thing, and now I'm hooked.

Reading progress update: I've read 78 out of 365 pages.

Dear Daughter: A Novel - Elizabeth E. Little

I'll probably sample a little more of this tonight--it's intriguing, but I have to hope the plot can match the narrator's voice, for sheer entertainment.

"Because no one - no one - daydreams about pretty names more than girls called Jane. And with good reason, you know? I mean, even our most illustrious Janes are world-class sticks-in-the-mud. Austen, Eyre, Doe? Spinster, sucker, corpse. It's a wonder I managed as well as I did.
"

Dear Daughter, by Elizabeth Little (copyright 2014; quote is from page 14 of the Penguin Books trade paperback).

Reading progress update: I've read 20 out of 365 pages.

Dear Daughter: A Novel - Elizabeth E. Little

I love it already. I love Jane too--but that's probably a dangerous thing to do.