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Tigus

Tigus

Currently reading

The Triumphs of Eugene Valmont
Robert Barr
Progress: 27/220 pages
The Platform Edge: Uncanny Tales of the Railways
Mike Ashley
Progress: 202/304 pages
El Norte: The Epic and Forgotten Story of Hispanic North America
Carrie Gibson
Progress: 322/560 pages
Call Down The Thunder
Dietrich Kalteis
Progress: 68/317 pages

Reading progress update: I've read 52 out of 317 pages.

Call Down The Thunder - Dietrich Kalteis

just getting back into this for the evening...it reads a bit like a Stephen King novel, is my early reaction.

My 10 Most Likely Reads for April

after what I'm reading now, and Tennison, here are the books that I think I'll go to in April, as it unfolds:

Reading progress update: I've read 45 out of 317 pages.

Call Down The Thunder - Dietrich Kalteis

dusty, dry, Depression-Era Kansas - I think I've been transported to around 1937. I already like Sonny and Clara; she has split from him and gone trekking - sick of dust and no money - but it looks like the narrative will be following both of them, and I still think their fates will be highly interconnected.

 

this is billed as a Crime novel. a bank robbery scheme has been hatched among some supporting characters - the banks already despised for foreclosing on everything - but I don't know if Sonny is going to be involved with that. the plot synopsis on the back of the book does suggest that Sonny will be turning to crime - in a way that gets back at the banks - as he gets more desperate. and Clara has teamed up with a so-called "rainmaker"...

 

I like it so far.

Reading progress update: I've read 1 out of 317 pages.

Call Down The Thunder - Dietrich Kalteis

well, I’ve changed that mind of mine, again; it happens sometimes. I’ve decided to read this next instead of The Day of the Dead.

Reading progress update: I've read 134 out of 246 pages.

The Cornish Coast Murder - John Bude

and now the matter of some missing money - a paltry sum, but where did it go?

 

still very happy with this book; I’m enjoying it more than The Sussex Downs Murder.

Reading progress update: I've read 98 out of 246 pages.

The Cornish Coast Murder - John Bude

there's just something about this one - I absolutely love it. gonna try and finish it tonight.

Reading progress update: I've read 49 out of 246 pages.

The Cornish Coast Murder - John Bude

I’m in the right mood for a Golden Age Country House Mystery, and I am hooked after four chapters.

 

what’s up with Ruth? who was the nasty man with the gaiters, lurking around Greylings before the murder? which footprints mean something, what do the footprints showing so-and-so running mean - or is it the absence of footprints in key places that is significant, and also puzzling, after the rain? I mean, if a stranger got near enough to the house to fire the shots, where’s the evidence?

 

I guess the Vicar is our amateur sleuth...good for him!

Reading progress update: I've read 202 out of 304 pages.

The Platform Edge: Uncanny Tales of the Railways - Mike Ashley

I’m absolutely thrilled that the last story in this book is by my favourite Horror writer, Ramsey Campbell - but still a long way to go before I get there. and that’s fine with me. I just sampled two more stories of creepy trains and railways - one by T. G. Jackson, and one by E. F. Benson - and though they didn’t rank quite as high as the stories that I have loved most in this book, they were still just fine by me.

 

I love this book!

TBR Next

4 Standout Books from My March 2020

Reading progress update: I've read 1 out of 246 pages.

The Cornish Coast Murder - John Bude

that takes care of the Martin Edwards Introduction - gee, how many times have I typed that, and how many times will it happen again - so it's on to the novel itself. I did not know that this author had started his writing career as an author of early SF and Fantasy.

Reading progress update: I've read 220 out of 310 pages.

Crossbones Yard: A Thriller - Kate Rhodes

well, tonight I just kept reading, and reading, and reading - and I have warmed to this strange serial killer novel as I’ve gone along. by the way, to correct an earlier Post, I should say Alice would say she goes for a run, not a jog. and she would probably be a bit testy about it, too.

 

Will, Sean, Burns, Alvarez - if the killer (same as Alice’s stalker??) is someone already featured in the story, who should I look at?

 

Cley? Hari? um, Gareth? that other cop who drives Alice around now and then (the cops have her under constant protection)? one of the women (I’m not sure I buy that)? should. I be looking at bit players, or unlikely candidates?

 

so, it’s turned into a fairly engrossing read, but I think I’m done for the night (maybe not). I think I will go to The Cornish Coast Murder by John Bude next.

Reading progress update: I've read 108 out of 310 pages.

Crossbones Yard: A Thriller - Kate Rhodes

Alice sure does like to jog!

 

I’m exactly where I was with this book - in terms of reaction and enjoyment level - as when I started it: it’s not the perfect fit for me, but it’s miles ahead of the last two duds I grappled with. and if she’s got some decent surprises or scares lurking ahead, then I might start thinking higher than 3 or 3.5 stars. long way to go.

More 1970s Movies

I won’t get to all three of them tonight, but for my next three 1970s film selections, the genre is Crime:

 

Family Plot

The Long Goodbye

Rolling Thunder

Reading progress update: I've read 56 out of 310 pages.

Crossbones Yard: A Thriller - Kate Rhodes

well, there are a few nitpicks floating around in my head, but (a) this was a debut novel, and (b) this cannot possibly get as unpalatable as the last two novels I accidentally stained the brain with. I like it. Alice and her world are intriguing, and a bit scary (not her fault; at least, it doesn’t seem so right now).

Reading progress update: I've read 27 out of 220 pages.

The Triumphs of Eugene Valmont - Robert Barr

it is my recollection that a biographer of P G Wodehouse, in discussing what the humourist liked to read in his spare time, mentioned that Wodehouse liked Thrillers and Mysteries - with one name mentioned being that of Robert Barr. I had never heard of him. I took a Robert Barr novel out from the local library, and didn’t finish it; in fact, I don’t think I got too far into it at all. at 16-17 years old, I wasn’t quite the eclectic reader I would become.

 

last year, I think it was, Barr got another chance with older me, when I read some HarperCollins collection of Horror and Suspense stories by a trio of writers, one of them Barr. his name on the book, along with Jerome K. Jerome, made me give that book a try.

 

I thought The Triumphs of Eugene Valmont was a novel when I saw a listing for it as something my local Mystery bookstore had in stock, and emailed them to put it on hold for me. when I dropped in to pick it up, I was disappointed to find it was more short stories (a bit of irony here: over a hundred years ago, this book, and some rival short-story books by other authors, were being ‘dressed up’ or edited to seem like novels, as that format was becoming more and more popular) - but I talked myself into buying it anyway. I was intrigued by the back-cover making plain that Valmont is the author’s response to Sherlock Holmes, a sort of parody.

 

the first story was fun, refreshingly different in its outcome. the Introduction to the book made a point of mentioning what might be considered the ‘best’ three or four stories in the book, and this isn’t one of them if you buy into the published opinion, but still, I liked it, and don’t want the first story in a short story collection to be the best one.